Øyvind Paasche

Øyvind Paasche

Forsker II
Telefon: +47 56 10 75 44
Epost: oypa@norceresearch.no
Kontoradresse: Jahnebakken 5, 5007 Bergen, Norway

Øyvind Paasche has a long-term interest in past and present climate change and dynamics, especially at high latitudes. During later years, he has developed a keen interest in how scientific data are handled, used and understood by stakeholders and policymakers. He is both a Senior Scientist and a Senior Advisor with the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research and NORCE Climate. Prior to his present engagement, he was the leader of the Bergen Marine Research Cluster for nearly six years (2011-2016). He has also had several positions with University of the Arctic (UArctic) which included being the Chair of Research.

He has authored and co-authored over 30 studies in international peer-reviewed journals, co-edited the book The New Arctic, published in 2015 by Springer. He has also co-authored a book on how the climate system works called What is Climate? (in Norwegian) as well as being a contributing author to the 4th IPPC report (The Physical Science Basis). Paasche leads several ongoing projects such as Ocean Outlook (2016-20), Hordaflom (2017-2020), Advanced Climate Education and Research (2018-2021) and is also a member of Seasonal Forecasting Engine (2018-2021). Paasche is part of the team running the well-known summer school Advanced Climate Dynamics Courses (ACDC) and is currently the Chair of the Scientific Steering Committee for the international initiative Synoptic Arctic Survey (SAS).

Aktuelt

Ekstern lenke

Unsustainable Science

Reaching a more sustainable Earth relies upon the scientific community to generate critical insights and solutions, but we fear that this will not happen to the extent or in the time needed unless science itself becomes more sustainable.

Ekstern lenke

Trials, errors and improvements in co-production of climate services.

Climate change yields both challenges and opportunities. In both cases, costly adaptations and transformations are necessary and desirable, and these must be based on realistic and relevant climate information. However, it is often difficult for climate scientists to communicate this information to decision-makers and stakeholders, and it can be equally difficult for such actors to interpret and put the information to use. In this essay, we discuss experiences and present recommendations for scientists producing climate services. The basis is our work in several climate service projects. One of them aimed to provide local-scale climate data for municipalities in western Norway and to explore how the data were interpreted and implemented. The project was first based solely on climate science expertise, and the participants did not have sufficient competence on coproduction and knowledge about the regulatory and political landscape in which municipalities operate. Initially, we also subscribed to an outdated idea of climate services, where knowledge providers (climate scientists) “deliver” their information to knowledge users (e.g., municipal planners). Increasingly, as stressed in the literature on coproduction of knowledge, we learned that climate service should be an iterative process where actionable information is coproduced through two-way dialogue. On the basis of these and other lessons learned the hard way, we provide a set of concrete recommendations on how to embed the idea of coproduction from the preproposal stage to beyond the end of climate service projects.

Ekstern lenke

Magnetic and geochemical signatures of flood layers in lake sediments.

River floods holds the capasity to erode and transport sediments that are deposited whenever the discharge is reduced. In catchments that are subjected to repeated flooding, downstream lakes can therefore contain a record of past events across multiple timescales. High‐resolution core scanning analyses, such as X‐ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning and magnetic susceptibility (MS) provide data that are frequently used to detect flood layers in soft sediment archives, such as lakes, fjords and ocean basins. Deposits of past floods also can potentially reveal information about the evolution of flood events as well as source area. Here we explore ways in which subtle variability in high‐resolution data can be utilized and subsequently vetted by high‐precision measurements in order to delineate the copious information that can be extracted from soft sediment records. By combining magnetic hysteresis measurements and first‐order reversal curves (FORCs) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP‐OES) measurements of chemical elements on 36 samples, questions about flood dynamics and variability are raised, and also sources of noise in high‐resolution scanning techniques are discussed. Specifically, we show that a lake flood record from Southern Norway containing 92 floods distributed over 10,000 years can be subdivided into two groups of floods that were generated either by spring snow melting, intense summer rainstorms, or a combination of both. The temporal evolution of this pattern shows a marked shift toward spring floods around 2000 years ago compared to the earlier part of the record.

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