Society is increasingly vulnerable to high-impact weather and climate extremes

VIDEO: Human life, infrastructure, food security, transport and many other sectors are at risk to climate hazards.

Sist oppdatert: Dec 9, 2019
Published Dec 4, 2019

Enhancing societal resilience and reducing the exposure of our economy to climate risk is becoming more and more urgent, climate researcher and meteorologist Erik Kolstad at NORCE and the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research points out.

Short-range weather forecasts are already invaluable tools for planning ahead. There is a clear need for climate information beyond the next 10 days and up to decades into the future – the subseasonal-to-decadal (‘S2D’ hereafter) time horizon.

On 25 September 2019, Kolstad and NORCE submitted the proposal for a new Centre for Research-Based Innovation: Climate Futures. The centre will launch in late 2020, provided it receives a grant from the Research Council of Norway.

Our main objective is to co-produce new and innovative solutions for predicting and managing climate risks from 10 days to 10 years into the future, working with a cluster of partners in climate- and weather-sensitive sectors.

The consortium consists of seven research partners and nearly 30 user partners from the business sector, representing aquaculture, agriculture, renewable energy, disaster preparedness, shipping, insurance, finance, risk management services, as well as public organizations.

More info: https://www.norceresearch.no/en/projects/climate-futures
https://www.climatefutures.no/

Erik kolstad
The main objective is to co-produce new and innovative solutions for predicting and managing climate risks from 10 days to 10 years into the future, says climate researcher Erik Kolstad, NORCE. (Photo: Andreas R. Graven)